A literary analysis of the indifferent by john donne

He refers to promiscuity as a vice and constancy as a virtue, using many sexual references to help illustrate his points. Princes are mere shadows of my beloved and me: These two lines do not come from the speaker, but from Donne, who is telling the audience that the morals that the speaker had proposed are completely opposite of the ones that you should uphold.

This poem presents a speaker that holds morals opposite the ones accepted by the greater part of society.

John Donne’s “The Indifferent”: Critical Analysis

The speaker begins expressing his open-minded approach, telling his female audience, I can love both fair and brown, Her whom abundance melts, and her whom want betrays, Her who loves loneness best, and her who masks and plays.

The speaker is trying to convince the women that he is talking to that promiscuity is a good thing and that neither he, nor the women should be faithful to their mate. Much of his writing was a reaction against social and poetic traditions, including the Petrarchan tradition that praised the perfect woman, an ideal, rather than viewing women in a realistic manner.

This text strongly resembles classical poems such as those of Ovidand its phrasing is brisk, accessible, highly imaginative, and laced with erotic puns. Donne successfully creates a character in a simple love poem that believes that there is nothing more to love than lust, and then uses his point of view to portray a A literary analysis of the indifferent by john donne of love that is completely opposite of what Donne wants the reader to get from the poem.

Thy beams, so reverend and strong Why shouldst thou think? A small urn, well-crafted, is as worthy to hold the greatest ashes as a vast tomb, and the sonnets my love and I inspire will see us canonised, or declared saints, for our love.

Even intensely physical love? You can call us what you like, but we are who we are because we love. Donne parodies the Petrarchan writers who had exaggerated their sufferings through far-fetched conceits.

Will no other vice content you? He describes the various ways in which his aristocratic friends while away their time. Reading of The Canonization. Thus, Donne concludes his tongue-in-cheek presentation by indicting members of his own sex for the sin that they had traditionally employed to condemn women.

Women, he asserts, make men work perhaps in bed; certainly because of the curse of the Biblical fall. And those who do so will declare to us: They do not mean to prove themselves historically.

Will no other vice content you? Donne wants others to leave him alone to relish his love in peace. As in other poems by Donne, that speaker is witty, inventive, and argumentative. The first two stanzas of the poem seem to be the speaker talking to an audience of people, w hile the last one looks back and refers to the first two stanzas as a "song.

This poem presents a speaker that holds morals opposite the ones accepted by the greater part of society. If we cannot live by our love we can die by it, and if our love is not fit for the tomb and hearse of death, it is fitting for poetry.

The playfully taunting tone continues into the second stanza as the speaker asks a representative woman why "no other vice" contents the female. Other sample model essays: The poet also claims that they find in each other the powerful eagle and the timid dove, the eagle usually preying upon the latter.

Essays in Literary Analysis. Critical Analysis of "The Indifferent" by John Donne "The Indifferent" by John Donne is a relatively simple love poem in comparison to his other, more complicated works. Saucy pedantic wretch, go chide Late school boys and sour prentices, Go tell court huntsmen that the king will ride, Call country ants to harvest offices, Love, all alike, no season knows nor clime, Nor hours, days, months, which are the rags of time.

If their love is not fit to confine itself to the expanse of the tomb, it will be eligible for versification by virtue of which it will live on eternally. While this poem is not incredibly complicated, it is very interesting to see how Donne spends the first 25 lines of the poem building up a convincing argument, then completely rebutting it in the final two lines.

Donne asserts that they may be called whatever the world chooses to call them. Donne starts every line with either "I can love" or "Her who. Works Cited Cruttwell, Patrick.

Donne successfully creates a character in a simple love poem that believes that there is nothing more to love than lust, and then uses his point of view to portray a portrait of love that is completely opposite of what Donne wants the reader to get from the poem.

The poet implies that they will build a beautiful memorial with stanzas. According to Eleanor McNees, "Donne realizes that erotic license is irreconcilable with norms of truth and troth" He assures women that men are not faithful, and he urges women not to be faithful either.“The Indifferent” by John Donne is a relatively simple love poem in comparison to his other, more complicated works.

In this poem, “he presents a lover who regards constancy as a ‘vice’ and promiscuity as the path of virtue and good sense” (Hunt 3).

Literary Analysis: John Donne's

Analysis of Literary Technique in John Donne's "The Sun Rising" John Donne, author of many works of literature, including "The Sun Rising", is a master manipulator of literary techniques, which he uses to convey a powerful and profound message to the reader.

Critical Analysis of "The Indifferent" by John Donne "The Indifferent" by John Donne is a relatively simple love poem in comparison to his other, more complicated works.

John Donne’s “The Indifferent” is a line lyric poem dealing with secular love. It was first printed in Poems, By J.

The Indifferent

D. with Elegies on the Authors Death (), although it circulated, in various versions, in a number of manuscripts before and after that date.

Critical Analysis of The Indifferent by John Donne Essay - Critical Analysis of "The Indifferent" by John Donne "The Indifferent" by John Donne is a relatively simple love poem in comparison to his other, more complicated works.

Critical Analysis of "The Indifferent" by John Donne "The Indifferent" by John Donne is a relatively simple love poem in comparison to his other, more complicated works. In this poem, "he presents a lover who regards constancy as a 'vice' and promiscuity as the path of virtue and good sense" (Hunt 3).

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A literary analysis of the indifferent by john donne
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